Durst taps UAG to construct the newest Hallets Point buildings

Contractor is a newcomer to NYC

TRD New York /
Sep.September 07, 2017 04:16 PM

Rendering of Hallets Point (inset: UAG’s Andrew D’Amico)

The Durst Organization has selected Urban Atelier Group to handle construction at the two newest buildings at its Hallets Point development, a 2.4 million square-foot mixed-use project planned for the Astoria waterfront.

UAG will serve as construction manager on 26-02 First Street and 26-40 First Street, Durst confirmed on Thursday. The developer filed plans for the two buildings in April, calling for a total of 652 apartments across the two projects. The building at 26-02 First Street will span 270,000 square feet, including 2,400 square feet of commercial space. The other at 26-40 First Street is expected to span 350,000-square feet, 7,000 square feet of which will be set aside as commercial space.

According to permit applications filed with the city Department of Buildings, UAG’s work in the city is somewhat limited. The company, which was founded in 2015, is working on a condominium tower for L+M Development Partners at 25 Park Row in the Financial District, as well as a four-story building for Kaufman Astoria Studios at 36-02 34th Avenue in Queens. The Hallets Point projects will be the company’s third and fourth new buildings in the city, according to DOB filings.

Representatives from UAG didn’t return a call seeking comment. UAG is headed by Andrew D’Amico, a former executive of Hunter Roberts Construction Group.

New Line Structures is serving as construction manager at Hallet Points’ first project, 26-01 First Street. Durst broke ground on that building last year, and the building topped out on Thursday. The developer plans to build a total of 2,400 rental apartments across seven buildings. It’s not yet clear who will handle construction on the other four buildings.


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