College students pay up to break leases and ditch dorms

California doesn’t protect lease-breaking related to coronavirus pandemic though many universities have shifted to online classes

TRD LOS ANGELES /
Jun.June 17, 2020 10:04 AM
Some California college students are cutting big checks to their landlords to break leases (Credit: iStock)
Some California college students are cutting big checks to their landlords to break leases (Credit: iStock)

California state law now protects residents from getting evicted over nonpayment but it does not address a different need among renters, particularly college students.

With many California colleges and universities having canceled in-person classes over coronavirus concerns, students who signed apartment leases are now stuck with no legal way to exit without paying penalties, according to the Los Angeles Times.

While state lawmakers barred evictions and foreclosures soon after the virus took hold, they have yet to address the issue of breaking a lease.

Renters — including college students — can only legally break their leases in accordance with the previously agreed-upon terms. In some cases, that means paying a lump sum to vacate the unit.

The 23-campus California State University system is among those that have moved primarily to online courses for the fall, which will cut into occupancy levels at surrounding apartment properties.

One UC Irvine student said she and her three roommates paid almost $2,000 each to break their lease with landlord Irvine Company, according to the Times. Only Solano County passed a law allowing residents to break their leases without penalty as long as it’s related to the pandemic.

Other students are reconsidering whether to rent an apartment near their schools if they’ll only have one or two classes if any on campus this semester.

Low occupancy could spell trouble for student housing investors. Though much has changed since April, pre-leasing rates then were relatively unchanged at around 65 percent, compared to 2019; leasing rates vary considerably between markets.

San Francisco Bay Area tenant law attorney Joseph Tobener said that he’s fielding between 15 to 20 calls a week from parents and students who want to break their leases, according to the Times. [LAT]Dennis Lynch


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
Single-family and condo home sales were up sharply in L.A. County in June

“Massive release of demand”: LA County June home sales surge

“Massive release of demand”: LA County June home sales surge
Michael Rosenfeld and a rendering of Century Plaza (Credit: Presley Ann/Getty Images for THR)

Inside Michael Rosenfeld’s $1.8B odyssey at Century Plaza

Inside Michael Rosenfeld’s $1.8B odyssey at Century Plaza
An illustration of Gov. Gavin Newsom (Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

LA County ordered to shut indoor dining for 3 weeks as Covid cases climb

LA County ordered to shut indoor dining for 3 weeks as Covid cases climb
Brookfield Asset Management CEO Bruce Flatt and Woodridge CEO Michael Rosenfeld with 101 S. Marengo Avenue, and a rendering of the building (Credit: Google Maps)

CRE investment sales in LA sank like a stone in May

CRE investment sales in LA sank like a stone in May
John Zhao and a rendering of Oceanwide Center (Credit: Rendering © DBOX; Nora Tam/South China Morning Post via Getty Images)

Coronavirus forces another delay of Oceanwide Center sale in San Fran

Coronavirus forces another delay of Oceanwide Center sale in San Fran
Gov. Gavin Newsom (Getty)

Not so fast! A week after they reopened, state orders LA County bars to close

Not so fast! A week after they reopened, state orders LA County bars to close
Douglas Elliman CEO Howard Lorber and West Coast exec Stephen Kotler

In “new world of real estate,” Elliman exits Montecito office

In “new world of real estate,” Elliman exits Montecito office
Scott Gale and a rendering of the project

Ventus Group can break ground on its $455M Exposition Point project outside USC

Ventus Group can break ground on its $455M Exposition Point project outside USC
arrow_forward_ios

The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

Loading...