Houston home designed by legendary architect John Staub relisted on market

The traditional-style property at 3 Remington Lane has been relisted for just under $10 million

Architect John Staub and 3 Remington Lane in Houston (HAR.com, University of Houston Libraries, iStock)
Architect John Staub and 3 Remington Lane in Houston (HAR.com, University of Houston Libraries, iStock)

An architectural gem designed by Houston’s John Staub has been relisted for just under $10 million, Chron.com reported.

The four-bedroom, seven-bathroom home at 3 Remington Lane was designed for Margaret Cullinan Wray, the daughter of Texaco founder Joseph Cullinan. It’s located in the small, gated neighborhood of Shadyside right between Rice University and the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston.

When the current owners of the home, Robert and Emily Clay, purchased it several years ago, they planned to remodel before moving in. After a gut renovation, they eventually decided to sell, and put the property on the market last fall for about $12.5 million.

Read more

From left: Mike Mahlstedt, Compass; Claudia Da Silva, Coldwell Banker Realty (Compass, Coldwell Banker Realty, iStock)
Residential
Texas
Houston’s biggest mansion sales last month
Houston’s hot housing market may finally be cooling
Houston
Houston’s hot housing market may finally be cooling

Sign Up for the undefined Newsletter

“We’ve had offers on the house, we just haven’t come to terms,” said Hedley Karpas, the property’s agent, who added that the house will most likely appeal to any buyer who appreciates its history and “really appreciates the architecture of John Staub — the perfect symmetry of the house.”

Cullinan was the original developer of Shadyside, but when his daughter became engaged, he commissioned Staub to design her a house on the property as a wedding present, Karpas says. Some of the original playground equipment even remains.

Staub is a renowned residential architect famous for designing several traditional-style homes in Houston and other Texas cities, and his work is still held in high regard to this day. He has designed properties for some of Houston’s most prominent and influential citizens, including the former home of Ima Hogg, a philanthropist and patron famous as “The First Lady of Texas,” a portion of the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, and the home of Rice University’s president.

[Chron.com] — James Bell